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20120701
20120731
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CSPAN2 16
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16
CSPAN
Jul 22, 2012 12:00pm EDT
. there is something inherent she could not use. the first singular pronoun with the enemy of jeane. she could not write a modest personal revelation to go into mmr. so that had failed. i talked to a great lengths trying to convince her. she was so yeah, i would like to come i can't. finally said i'll help you. all too extensive interviews and basically do a syllabus. i was naÏve of me in some sense to edit. you can work as an editor at their own life rather than the creator. we went a lot like that for quite a number of conversations and she eventually was unable to really commit herself to do it. and after she died, i is kind of a promise to keep -- it's not issue yourself that it's a big life, but it's a very important life. i did this to keep her memory. postcode that of course explains the title. the big little life. this important values she learned in the american heartland. she grew up in a society where the values were good, poor growth in young women were not necessarily encourage to a four-year college degree or have a career. if you talk about your family background and instead in
CSPAN
Jul 15, 2012 9:00pm EDT
international standards it costs us in terms of respect to the rest of the rld which has much in many cases stronger standards than we do in these st self-governing society and one in which certain rules are enforced on the government itself. .. >> an hourlongrogram where we invite guest hosts to interview authors. this week, biogpher per llon l ras olal n. he examines the le of the first female u.s. ambassador to the united nions and a key member of reagan's foreign policy team, jeane kirkpatrick. he discusses the mes-roia ofr angela stent. >> host: welcome to c-span's "after words." my name is angela stent, i'm director for the center for euantuds a getian andeast er, mesda polr, h the author of "political woman: the big little life of jeane kirkpatrick." mr. collier, as a prolific biographer, you've written biographies of the kennedys, the roelan'rrye eatoe erda jeane kirkpatrick was a pioneer in many ways. she was the first american woman to be ambassador to the united nations. she also elevad thatosition to cabinet rank. wempnt deatndn bl pies. she was also controversial. her politic
CSPAN
Jul 16, 2012 12:00am EDT
st reagan administration, taken a sizable advance, and there was something in her. she could not use --he first person singular pronoun was an enemy of jeanne's. she couldn't bring herself to do the sort of e mest veti, enge -- personal revelation into her million missouri and -- memoirs, and i talked too her trying to convince her, and she was like, i'd like too but i can't. ani sd,'lelp y doew a do a syllabus -- naive of me, work as an editor of your own life rather than a creator of your own life. so we went long like that for quite a number of conversations, andhell wna lyom hdo it, and after she died, i thought, this is the kind of promiseo keep. it's not as she herself said, a big life, but it's a very important life, and i did this book to keep her moryre >>os tt mp -- explains the title, boy r "the big little life." it's important to arabout the values shelash in the heartland. and she grew up in a socty where the values were very good, but whereir yom ot nessalyge get a four-year college degree or have a career. so if you could talk about her family background and the things
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2012 9:00pm EDT
that rationally neutral black politicians have been using and talk about the consequences of the strategies for present day black politics. >> host: okay. so you'd say it's more than about obama, though? he's the central figure -- >> guest: yeah. it's a way lot more. i think history is very important to figuring out what's going on at the moment, and so not only it's about grounding the rise of obama, but within history i talk about the jesse jackson campaigns, chicago politics back in 1928 with the first blank -- black congressman coming from the southside of chicago. i talk about ideological fishers around liberation, theology, prosperity, gospel, and this long history about the politics of respectability. looking at -- the need of black elites to raise up what i describe as the untalented nine-tenths within the black community to present a positive face to america, white america, about racial progress. the rise of obama is within all of these contexts. to sort of explain the 2008 race and what obama did as a candidate, particularly when he faced issues of race, it has to be anchored in t
CSPAN
Jul 30, 2012 12:00am EDT
strategies that racially neutral black politics -- black politicians have been using, and talk about the consequences of those strategies for present-day black politics. >> host: you would say it's more than about obama, though. he is a stroll figure, kind of instigated -- >> guest: it's way, way a lot more. i think history is very important to sort of figuring out what's going on at the moment. and so not only it's about what a grounding the rise of obama within history, i talk about shirley chisolm, jesse jackson, chicago politics, starting way back in 1928. with the first black congressman from the south side of chicago, and i talk about these ideological fissures in black -- this long history about the politics of resuspectability, looking at the need of black elite to raise up what i would describe the untalented 9/10th s in the black community to put a positive face to white america about racial progress, and so the rise of obama is within all these contexts, and sort of explains the 2008 race and what obama did as a candidate, particularly when he faced issues of race. it has
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2012 10:00pm EDT
at the various campaign strategies that racially neutral lack politics and black politicians have been using and talks about the consequences of those strategies for present-day black politics. >> host: okay so you would say it's more than about obama though, the central theme, it's about a lot more? >> guest: it's way a lot more. i think history is very important to sort of figuring out what's going on at the moment and so not only is it about the grounding rise of obama within history. i talk about sort of shirley chisholm and jesse jackson campaigns and i talk about chicago politics starting way back in 1928 with the first black congressman coming from the south side chicago and i talk about the ideological fissures within the black communities around liberation theology, prosperity, gospel and this long history about the politics of respectability, looking at sort of the need of black communities to raise up what i would describe as the untalented 910th within the black community to present a positive face to america, to white america about racial progress and so the rise of obama is wit
CSPAN
Jul 1, 2012 11:00am EDT
. it is an umbrella program called project gunrunner that was sort under the bush administration that was using straw persons addressing them, stopping guys from buying guns and transferring them into mexico. they run a program called operation wide receiver under the bush administration where they were working with the mexican government, surveilling these guys and cartel members transferring tens into mexico and they were saying once these guns get to the border, mexico, you pi up the taand continue from there. the problem is the mexican government dropped the ball and the program was immediately shut down. under fast and furious, completely different story. the mexican government was informed about the program and instead of a few hundred guns we're talking about thousands of guns with no mexican government involvement to stop them. not to mention trying to actually trace them and keep them away and out of the hands and arrest the people before they were taken to violent crime scenes and used in murders. >> let's help our audience understand the geography of this program and the results or lack of
CSPAN
Jul 14, 2012 10:00pm EDT
although her mother was very gentile and it refused to allow that term to be used fa, wan oilman and an oil driller, who made a good living for the family but was a sole practitioner and was subjected to the cycles of or itrndd boom and bust ofh ma tmove away from oklahoma as the oil move towards illinois so to speak. and she was most likely to i'avdrof water.amily. the first grandchild on both des of the family. you know, one of the two leadi studen in her hghcl, ghie, acin very ambitious but she came of age right after the war and there was a sense that you know, even talented girls were supposed to excel an thencome me gmari. she got her father to allow her to a kind of semi-finishing school after graduating from high school and a place called stephen's coege inissouri which was a two-yearcolle. wupd inwen for you know, the domestic arts as it were, raising a family. she was unwilling to accept that and was part of the contial battle. there was an inedible pride abt her insidehe fily and thr fe t sir heketo all her, going to do? she is not going to have a faly of her own. what does a wom
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2012 12:00am EDT
women outlive theiroai adn adist at degw ath ec h n ewr us tea h ca, , ucfubuno time for me. with that and all of my other problems i lie awake at night after night ore depressed every day. this wasn't a chane,itwsa ste. an ytauttki t te da arn caur i e9sad6' a mostly targeting the medical doctors who were going to prescribe these medications to patients. and i was wondering what was about tha period that reall pt you atan maoucotataste gig thyw isk? >>statago io woprly say that that program which would be the 60's and 70's was kind of the beginning of th sloal oe wr oad pslol rbemba thalit e-dutad now they call it something else. at the beginning of the come on a feel calling the healthy enayek th n'owy siin inecdsenng ustedit coeradvertising. the other thing is it was a lot of the antiwoman thing because backenenwt t rvait we itedmel le aug o y u nihese or something and some of the things talked about or she doesn't want to do her dishes let's give her dr h th wto aot aeo leonotoims have the obligatory this drug
CSPAN
Jul 15, 2012 12:00pm EDT
and changethe workplace." thank you for being with us here on c-span booktv. >> you areagee bexme. puhi industries trade show. for more information visit book expo america.com. prtsbu, nur-gbov program or invite guest host interview authors. this week, martha rosenberg exposes the croissant rehang the scenes in the drug industries in her new book called the "born with a junk food deficien." with t help of dto andseerh ok ventply deinthe public health. she discusses finance its associat editor of fda week, stephanie beasley. >> host: lt's jus tote knsd fto fascinating and full of lots and lots of information. i was curious a to whether there was any particular news events or story that ipired you to start writing his. tho gewo ti guess n . t o rei s. were the hormone replacement and both were in early 2000. i began thinking, how did this happen? how did so manypeoplegeto cly dogowe sot kofhagot me interested in researching this staff. post go right, he worked as a journalist for several publications and listed and here worked ofitos" rnlons s arsodil copywriter if i'm not mistaken. so
CSPAN
Jul 8, 2012 9:00pm EDT
taote ost t seng dr.hes se e >> host: two things i want to talk about there. using these direct ads you see on television and drugnow a siffmycausve paul tisk unng? >> guest: i think it's kind of a broad question. i think that when you tak disease liio n he pad r antidepressant like i think a lot of people self diaosis it h tis interesng and we started with the ads that appeared in medical journals and and then go to thedirect consumer ads. but why do you think that he dos sestggt h re nt heoer whre oenyo ioabthd maundering what are some of the other dangers involved in that thrtcoeravgients in general? sme ealt' e lyn a legal the people believed it was, so it was a bi gateway that opened up that served hepi agt utt ro thiitotepa tht only he or she -- i shouldn't sa he is being asked can i have this drug? have this condition and i ne sa rbly.ei oto lmt rsurs the medical professionals, and i aso believe it causes a lot ofthe chondria. people hoarralfire rty e. tag t pur w inacn physicians and see these advertisements asking for medication. you owi guess what is the role of the ronsility
CSPAN
Jul 7, 2012 10:00pm EDT
be separate from what far misleading us? adisi'alwa whawkiniv advertising i had put in an ad for my car. i never thought i had looked at thec, bu buthatxact r so tka efng suimlyp thanawof fact that it does get through subliminally. tuom to mgeesponsibility t ex d tpe a ra our insurance ates and raises our taxes and the other sad part about it is that a lot of your doctors uaare veinsoewh h rlit. mot:y,a t s monlle. tabodathf that people initially thoug that direct consumer ads were illegal and the fda came out with guidelines and i believe 1997abtditca ate gedo f tgesh b sh r mn? regulations, or wh can they do at this point? >> guest: well, that is probab the biggest question in the wholeoo goto b legal. well, i would say it is improbably fda,because my beef with them has mre to w i dsmoas dth demefjicd nd uce is given to big pharma companies when they violate the rules of advertising and specifically the off label. pfllyhe having big settlements. but they were not taken off medicare and medicaid and their ceos wreoenof t . e thhi t k ffce oselu o inigu sed sort of review progr, wh
CSPAN
Jul 22, 2012 9:00pm EDT
of dignity and success. it's difficult for us today with to enter the 25 years of constitutional history at our backs to conceive a remarkably innovative novel idea of the presidency was. the great kings of the world are long gone now but in the 18th century of the time of the nation's birth they were in their heyday and it wasn'tclear the world's rivalry and dignity. but americans, having been handed a gift of the presidency never doubted it that's because the president isa product of themselves in a way no keen loroupe minister could ever be. that is one reason why the american presidency stirs so much interest for the broad populist and why perhaps so many americans have always been captivated by the white house reading game. plus the game is more to be the diversion and actually can tell something about how the president might succeed or fail and how they get crushed by history and the dynamics that bring forth the leaders of destiny. i was seeking the volume to put forth my own thoughts and observations about how the country's presidential politics has unfolded over the centuries. i
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2012 12:00pm EDT
they were accustomed to thinking about because we are so used to debating it in these by ari terms the kids are over medicated or do these drugs work to resolve symptoms that to get a more nuanced look at it like what is the quality of the experience with a new question. >> it's a new question and fresh question. did you find that the researchers were happy you were doing this or where they jumped by the whole enterprise? >> it ferried some of them were happy i was doing it especially the clinicians were happy i was doing it and the people who had the research and also saw a patient on a regular basis thought that it was a good question to ask and they had indeed seen this in their own practice. the researchers were more focused on what did the studies say well we don't have these studies and they were a little stumped. >> host: there are some studies he pointed to. very few, strikingly few given how important a topic this is. can you tell me about those? >> guest: i can distinguish between the social science researchers i was talking to and also working scientists. so the waterboarding sci
CSPAN
Jul 23, 2012 12:00am EDT
about. we're so used to debating it in binary terms are do these drugs work or are kids overmethod indicated, but to get a more nuanced look at it, what this quality of the experience, was a new question. >> host: did you find the researchers were doing it? >>> it varied. the clinicians were happy i was doing and it the people who did both research and also saw patients on a regular basis, thought it was good question to ask and they had indeed seen this in their own practice. the researchers were a little more focused on what did the studies say? we don't have these studies, and they were a little stumped. >> host: there are some studies -- strikingly few. can you tell me about those? >> guest: i should distinguish between the social science researchers and i was talking to and also the working scientists. so, the scientists, this was sort of not a question on their ray car screen but the social scientists, there's a small group of them who i think are doing some fascinating and pioneering work, doing a formal version of what i do in the book, which is to ask young people about th
CSPAN
Jul 21, 2012 10:00pm EDT
using personal stories of adults who are medicated as children ms. barnett explores the debate over prescribing psychiatric drugs from minors who are diagnosed with mental health issues. >> host: caitlin, in "dosed" you have done something that is quite unique which is telling the story of the generation of kids who are perhaps the first in large numbers to have grown up taking psychotropic dedications. how did you get the idea to do that and why and how did that idea come to you? >> first of all thank you for having me and interviewing me. i really appreciate it. i got the idea, i read a column in "the new york times" about a woman who had been almost 20 years taking antidepressants and she was wondering how they had affected her zero the column mentioned there was very little research, scientific research that talks about the way that these drugs have affected children's development as they were growing up. the study stomachs is that i myself have been taking medication since i was a teenager and i figured there must be huge numbers of people in my position and i would interested
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16